Mar │ avid book reader, music lover, amateur photographer, and snail mail writer │ my shampoo smells like bubblegum and I have a very impressive owl collection
"You’re only given a little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it."
Robin Williams (via booksquoteslove)
Sunday, 27 July 2014
Living room views

Living room views

Tuesday, 22 July 2014
'A Prayer for the 21st Century' by John Marsden. Comforting and wise words in these crazy times. #MH17

'A Prayer for the 21st Century' by John Marsden. Comforting and wise words in these crazy times. #MH17

Saturday, 19 July 2014
Sunday, 13 July 2014
I don’t think I’ve ever been this excited about having a bike again, because YAY! 🚲

I don’t think I’ve ever been this excited about having a bike again, because YAY! 🚲

Saturday, 12 July 2014
Monday, 7 July 2014
Sending out some happy mail #snailmailrevolution

Sending out some happy mail #snailmailrevolution

Saturday, 14 June 2014
distant-traveller:

New York to London Milky Way

Bright stars of Sagittarius and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy lie just off the wing of a Boeing 747 in this astronomical travel photo. The stratospheric scene was captured earlier this month during a flight from New York to London, 11,000 meters above the Atlantic Ocean. Of course the sky was clear and dark at that altitude, ideal conditions for astronomical imaging. But there were challenges to overcome while looking out a passenger window of the aircraft moving at nearly 1,000 kilometers per hour (600 mph). Over 90 exposures of 30 seconds or less were attempted with a fast lens and sensitive camera setting, using a small, flexible tripod and a blanket to block reflections of interior lighting. In the end, one 10 second long exposure resulted in this steady and colorful example of airborne astronomy.

Image credit & copyright: Alessandro Merga

distant-traveller:

New York to London Milky Way

Bright stars of Sagittarius and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy lie just off the wing of a Boeing 747 in this astronomical travel photo. The stratospheric scene was captured earlier this month during a flight from New York to London, 11,000 meters above the Atlantic Ocean. Of course the sky was clear and dark at that altitude, ideal conditions for astronomical imaging. But there were challenges to overcome while looking out a passenger window of the aircraft moving at nearly 1,000 kilometers per hour (600 mph). Over 90 exposures of 30 seconds or less were attempted with a fast lens and sensitive camera setting, using a small, flexible tripod and a blanket to block reflections of interior lighting. In the end, one 10 second long exposure resulted in this steady and colorful example of airborne astronomy.

Image credit & copyright: Alessandro Merga

Thursday, 5 June 2014
When I grow up I want to have a garden full of poppies ♡

When I grow up I want to have a garden full of poppies ♡

Wednesday, 4 June 2014
 
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